Tuesday, 18 June 2013

Roof fall survivor in TV documentary

A workman rescued by Kent, Surrey & Sussex Air Ambulance after falling 30ft from a roof is to be featured in award-winning TV medical documentary 24 hours in A&E next week (June 26th).

David Beck, 62, a satellite and aerial fitter, was working on a house in Rusper near Horsham when he fell onto concrete and suffered life-threatening head and chest injuries.

He was given emergency treatment at the scene by the helicopter’s doctor and critical care paramedic before being flown to King’s College Hospital in London as a “code red” medical emergency.

The transfer time to the specialist neurological centre was just 19 minutes – a journey that could have taken more than an hour by road.

Channel 4’s 24 hours in A&E shows David arriving at King’s where Scott is the senior nurse in charge of a very busy shift in the resuscitation area.

He says: “When you’ve got a full Resus where you’re completely rammed, but something else is coming in, you need to fit that in and you’ve got five minutes to do it.

“You’ve really got to fire off a lot of big decisions in a very short period of time.”

David, from Littlehampton, is given an emergency blood transfusion as his wife Pam is rushed to the major trauma centre under police escort following the accident in February, 2012.

She later reflects: “We all moan about our partners but you don’t realise it until something like this happens.”

More than 90 cameras filmed around the clock at King’s, offering unprecedented access to one of Britain’s busiest accident and emergency departments.

The 20-part documentary series used more than 90 cameras to film around the clock at King’s, offering unprecedented access to one of Britain’s busiest accident and emergency departments.

The hospital is recognised internationally for its work in liver disease and transplantation, neurosciences, cardiac, haemato-oncology, stroke and major trauma.

24 Hours in A&E is on every Wednesday at 9pm and won a Royal Television Society Award last year.

* In February, 2013, Kent, Surrey & Sussex Air Ambulance started carrying blood on the charity’s two helicopters.

This allows the doctor and paramedic to perform emergency transfusions at the scene of a medical emergency in a move which will benefit up to 100 patients a year.

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